Top 10 Ergonomic Picks

Here are my top 10 picks for ergonomic health that can help reduce the risk of carpal tunnel and other repetitive injury pain when working at the keyboard.

1. An Ergonomic Keyboard – Positioned with a wedge-shaped inverted “v” (also described as a “gable”), the split-keyboard places the wrists in a more neutral position than smaller, standard keyboards.

2. An Ergonomic Mouse – The Evoluent Vertical Mouse and the 3M Ergonomic Mouse are two styles of mice that place the forearm in the “handshake position” easing stress and tension on the muscles, tendons and nerves of the arm.

3. An Adjustable Under-the-Desk Keyboard Tray – Allows you to easily position your keyboard at the appropriate height. A must for any workstation, at home or in the office, that has multiple users. Many trays now also adjust for keyboard tilt allowing improvement for wrist angulation.

4. An Adjustable Monitor – Allows you to easily position the monitor at the appropriate height easing neck and shoulder pain. Once again, a must for any workstation that has multiple users.

5. Computer Glasses – Anyone who wears glasses, especially bifocals, is at high risk for neck and shoulder strain while working on the computer. Purchase a new pair of glasses that is prescribed specifically for computer use.

6. A Stretch-Break Program – You can not over-stretch while working (as long as you respect pain when performing the stretches). A program such as StretchSmart can cue you to take stretch breaks. You can customize the frequency and duration of the stretching sessions. You can also set the program to provide stretches for your specific high risk pain areas.


7. A Copy Holder
Eases neck strain caused by looking repetitively from the monitor to the desk while working from copy. If working with thicker stacks of copy, an on-the-desk model that fits in front of the monitor works well. Single sheets of copy can be placed directly to the right or left of the monitor.8. An Ergonomic Pen

The majority of people who I see for ergonomic assessments have a tendency to hold their pens too tightly causing thumb and hand pain when writing. Hold the pen lightly, using a roller-ball or felt-tip pen so less force is needed.9. A Good Chair

Your office chair should be adjustable for height, seat-depth and seat-tilt. It should have adjustable arm rests and good lumbar support. For petite women, a full-length lumbar back support may be helpful to improve the fit of the chair.10. A Good, Durable Cold Pack

We all have aches and pains now and again. The key is to keep an injury from progressing and settling in. Have a good cold pack readily available for use at the first sign of inflammation or pain. The ElastoGel Cold Packs are a clinical therapeutic favorite. They are durable, will not leak, and conform comfortable around bony areas. A cold “wrap” comes with Velcro straps attached that allow you to strap on the pack when you are on the go.

Advertisements

Pain-Free Mousing

When performing ergonomic assessments, the main factors that I have found that contribute to mousing pain include:

  • Mouse Positioning
  • Mouse Movement
  • Muscular Tension When Using the Mouse
  • Forearm Position

Here are some tips to help reduce your risk of developing a repetitive strain injury or tendinitis from mouse use.
MOUSE POSITIONING

Causes of Pain

  • Reaching forward for the mouse onto a desk that is higher than the keyboard.
  • Reaching for a mouse placed to the far side of the keyboard.

Tips for Preventing Pain

  • Position the mouse in a more comfortable and ergonomic location
    • Use an attachable mouse holder that adjusts to fit over numerical key pad (if you do not use the 10-key) or as closely to it as possible.
    • Or use a keyboard bridge over the numerical keys if you do not use the 10-key portion of the keyboard.
    • Or use a keyboard station such as the Contour Roller Pro which has a rollerbar mouse that is positioned immediately below the space bar of the keyboard.

MOUSE MOVEMENT

Causes of Pain

  • Excessive wrist or arm movement when activating the mouse.
  • Planting the wrist down and swiveling the mouse using wrist motion.
  • Planting the wrist down placing pressure against the carpal tunnel.
  • Bending the wrist backward (extended) when using the mouse.

Tips for Preventing Pain

  • The mouse should be at about the same level of the keyboard and positioned as closely to the keyboard as possible.
  • Avoid reaching forward, up, or out to the side when using the mouse. Position the mouse to avoid these movements (see mouse positioning tips).
  • Activate the mouse by using small movements from the shoulder and elbow muscles rather than the wrist muscles.

Ergonomics

  • Keep the shoulders relaxed.
  • The elbow should be held loosely at the side in a direct line under the shoulder.
  • The wrist should be held in a neutral position (not bent forward or back or angled to one side or the other).
  • Do not plant the wrist down on that desk or on a wrist rest. Glide the wrist over surfaces always maintaining the neutral position.

MUSCULAR TENSION WHEN USING THE MOUSE

Causes of Pain

  • Forcefully squeezing the mouse between the thumb and small finger.
  • Forcefully activating the mouse buttons or switches.

Tips for Preventing Pain

  • Hold the mouse as lightly as you can while still maintaining control.
  • Keep the fingers held loosely against buttons and switches, not floating tensely in the air.
  • Do not pound mouse buttons or forcefully squeeze switches. Use only the lightest force necessary to activate controls.
  • Using a wireless mouse can eliminate the tension of pulling against the cord (even these small tensions add up by the end of the day).
  • Use a mouse and mouse pad that can be switched easily from the right to the left hand to share the work load between the two hands.
  • A keyboard station such as the Contour Roller Pro that incorporates a rollerbar mouse eliminates the need to hold the mouse.
  • Research mousing options such as the NoHands foot-activated mouse or a head-activated mouse placed in a baseball cap.
  • Perform forearm and wrist stretches throughout the day.
  • Gently stretch the thumb into the hitch-hiking position.

FOREARM POSITIONING

Causes of Pain

  • The forearm rotated into the palm-down position for long periods of time.

Tips for Preventing Pain

  • Vertical mice are good choices as the hand shake position with the forearm neutral rather than palm down can relieve forearm stress.
  • Stretch into the palm-up position throughout the day.